MULTITUDE OF BLOGS None of the PDFs are my own productions. I've collected them from web (e-mule, avax, libreremo, socialist bros, cross-x, gigapedia..) What I did was thematizing. This blog's project is to create an e-library for a Heideggerian philosophy and Bourdieuan sociology Φ market-created inequalities must be overthrown in order to close knowledge gap. this is an uprising, do ya punk?

Monday, December 29, 2008

Derrida & Chérif - Islam and the West [made in istanbul]


[scars of différance presents]


Islam and the West:
A Conversation with Jacques Derrida
(Religion and Postmodernism Series)
By Mustapha Cherif


University Of Chicago Press



In the spring of 2003, Jacques Derrida sat down for a public debate in Paris with Algerian intellectual Mustapha Chérif. The eminent philosopher arrived at the event directly from the hospital where he had just been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, the illness that would take his life just over a year later. That he still participated in the exchange testifies to the magnitude of the subject at hand: the increasingly distressed relationship between Islam and the West, and the questions of freedom, justice, and democracy that surround it. As Chérif relates in this account of their dialogue, the topic of Islam held special resonance for Derrida—perhaps it is to be expected that near the end of his life his thoughts would return to Algeria, the country where he was born in 1930. Indeed, these roots served as the impetus for their conversation, which first centers on the ways in which Derrida’s Algerian-Jewish identity has shaped his thinking. From there, the two men move to broader questions of secularism and democracy; to politics and religion and how the former manipulates the latter; and to the parallels between xenophobia in the West and fanaticism among Islamists. Ultimately, the discussion is an attempt to tear down the notion that Islam and the West are two civilizations locked in a bitter struggle for supremacy and to reconsider them as the two shores of the Mediterranean—two halves of the same geographical, religious, and cultural sphere. Islam and the West is a crucial opportunity to further our understanding of Derrida’s views on the key political and religious divisions of our time and an often moving testament to the power of friendship and solidarity to surmount them.

NEW LINK (and I think it is the only one that works)

mediafire link: thanks enes for the pdf, in this time of extreme unsociability

rapidshare link

+
Derrida interview on Holocaust

Monday, December 15, 2008

"Tarnac" (for urgency urges)


Support is still needed, so please sign the petition.

http://www.soutien11novembre.org/

http://www.mesopinions.com/petition-de-soutien-aux-inculpes-du-11-Novembre-petition-petitions-81da97ce3744e2e84a145009aadbc0f9.html

Comité de soutien aux inculpés de Tarnac, le bourg, 19170 Tarnac

Financial help is also needed for the support group. Cheques can be made payable to Comité de soutien aux inculpés de Tarnac and sent to Comité de soutien aux inculpés de Tarnac, le bourg, 19170 Tarnac The use of the term terrorism in this affair is extremely disturbing. Thanks!!


PREMIERS SIGNATAIRES

Giorgio Agamben, philosophe
Alain Badiou, philosophe
Jean-Christophe Bailly, écrivain
Anne-Sophie Barthez, professeur de droit
Miguel Benasayag, écrivain
Daniel Bensaïd, philosophe
Luc Boltanski, sociologue
Judith Butler, philosophe
Pascale Casanova, critique littéraire
François Cusset, philosophe
Christine Delphy, sociologue
Isabelle Garo, philosophe
François Gèze, éditions La Découverte
Jean-Marie Gleize, professeur de littérature
Eric Hazan, éditions La Fabrique
Rémy Hernu, professeur de droit
Hugues Jallon, éditions La Découverte
Stathis Kouvelakis, philosophe
Nicolas Klotz, réalisateur
Frédéric Lordon, économiste
Jean-Luc Nancy, philosophe
Bernard Noël, poète
Dominique Noguez, écrivain
Yves Pagès, éditions Verticales
Karine Parrot, professeur de droit
Jacques Rancière, philosophe
Jean-Jacques Rosat, philosophe
Carlo Santulli, professeur de droit
Rémy Toulouse, éditions Les Prairies ordinaires
Enzo Traverso, historien
Jérôme Vidal, éditions Amsterdam
Slavoj Zizek, philosophe

from the comment by g [a letter, an indication, a heterogeneity shines forth; glory for the finitude we share. thank you.]

Monday, December 8, 2008

Fiat Justitia Ruat Caelum, or the issue for thinking "world" anew

"the seasons change continually while I stand at the window... I see how the catastrophe is shaping up; looking out of the window I see it shaping up noiselessly, taking place noiselessly. I am not allowed to speak of it."

Gargoyles, Thomas Bernhard Vintage press, p.192-8


being exposed to the hetero-affection through/of the lines of Nancy's "The Creation of the World or Globalization," transcribing experience of an (more) originary repetition - 'order of things' (sens) on the way to think world anew, are being torn asunder. no system, no more alwayss, just fragments to directives (Lingis) through the imperative. a dedication which demands a soberness to bear this pain transcribed in the lines of Bernhard.

with these motivations in mind, I made up this collection.

thanks for the e-mails asking if I am sick or finished up with blogging. sorry for such a long delay, I'll try to discipline myself for posting in a more regular fashion.




Goodbye Alexandros Grigoropoulos






more information on Tarnac 9 affair & Tiqqun

Coupat, a ph.d student at EHESS "école des hautes études sciences sociales" studied situationism, entitled 'perspective et critique de la pensee situationniste' (dea dissertation 1997).

http://notesforthecomingcommunity.blogspot.com/2008/04/tiqqun-de-la-noche.html
http://www.tiqqun.info/
http://www.softtargetsjournal.com/v21/tiqqun.php
http://info.interactivist.net/node/3556


Next Issue:

Marx
Bourdieu
Teresa Brennan


edit: I love this video by Beach House "used to be"

On the Study of Greek Poetry by Friedrich Von Schlegel [made in istanbul]


[made in istanbul]

On the Study of Greek Poetry
by Friedrich Von Schlegel

Stuart Barnett (translator and foreword)


after seeing that most of the people are not even aware of this text I felt an urgency to xerox it, an urgency to remind.


text of the epochal turn: a companion to planetary age

p.s. by mistake I named the file's author schelling

Philosophical Fragments by Friedrich Schlegel

Philosophical Fragments
by Friedrich Schlegel

Rodolphe Gasche (Foreword), Peter Firchow (Translator)

Fredrich Schlegel has long been recognized as the central force behind the early German Romantic movement. Schlegel first defined and coined the term “Romantic” in the present sense, employing a fragmentary yet forceful tone to proclaim the doctrine that became recognized as a philosophical position distinct from Idealism (Hegel) or the poetics of poetry (Holderlin) and ultimately ushered in the modern age in literature. At a time when the function of criticism is again coming under close skeptical scrutiny, Schlegel's unorthodox, highly original mind, as revealed in these foundational "fragments," provides the critical framework for reflecting on contemporary experimental texts.

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The Paradox of Existence: Philosophy and Aesthetics in the Young Schelling

The Paradox of Existence: Philosophy and Aesthetics in the Young Schelling
(Topoi Library)
by Leonardo V. Distaso

This essay reconstructs Schelling's philosophical development during the years 1794-1800. It emphasizes the role of Kant's heritage within Schelling's early philosophy, and the strong relationship between Schelling and Hölderlin during their Tübingen years. The central question it explores is how the Absolute relates to Finiteness - a relation that constitutes the basis of transcendental idealism as well as the essence of a transcendental philosophy, here radically understood as a philosophy of finitude and as a critical aesthetics. The essay shows the young Schelling as he presents a rich and novel field of inquiry, which provides a credible and engaging alternative to Hegelian thinking and anticipates themes from twentieth-century philosophy (Phenomenology, Existentialism, Critical Thinking). The volume thus provides both a historical and a contemporary look at Schelling's early philosophy, and at its original and speculative approach.

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The Conspiracy of Life: Meditations on Schelling and His Time

The Conspiracy of Life: Meditations on Schelling and His Time
(Suny Series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy)
by Jason M. Wirth

The Conspiracy of Life offers a series of meditations on the philosophy of F. W. J. Schelling (1775-1854), a great-and greatly neglected-philosopher of life. Rather than construing him as a loopy mystic, or as an antiquated theologian, Jason M. Wirth attempts to locate Schelling as the belated contemporary of thinkers like Heidegger, Derrida, Bataille, Irigaray, Foucault, Deleuze, Levinas, and many others. As such, Schelling is already at the central nerve of current discussions concerning the crisis of truth; the primacy of the Good; the ecstatic nature of time; the nature of art; deep ecology; the world as an aesthetic phenomenon; comparative philosophy; the possibility of non-dialectical philosophy; radical evil; the haunting of philosophy; and the possibility of a philosophical religion.


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Schelling - Historical-Critical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mythology

Historical-Critical Introduction to the Philosophy of Mythology
(S U N Y Series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy)
by Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling (Author), Jason M. Wirth (Foreword), Mason Richey (Translator), Marcus Zisselsberger (Translator)

Translated here into English for the first time, F. W. J. Schelling's 1842 lectures on the Philosophy of Mythology are an early example of interdisciplinary thinking. In seeking to show the development of the concept of the divine Godhead in and through various mythological systems (particularly of ancient Greece, Egypt, and the Near East), Schelling develops the idea that many philosophical concepts are born of religious-mythological notions. In so doing, he brings together the essential relatedness of the development of philosophical systems, human language, history, ancient art forms, and religious thought. Along the way, he engages in analyses of modern philosophical views about the origins of philosophy's conceptual abstractions, as well as literary and philological analyses of ancient literature and poetry.

"F. W. J. Schelling remains a uniquely passionate, daring, and untimely philosopher. Now, more than 150 years after these lectures were given in Berlin, his time has come. This material is always intriguing and often thrilling. Schelling's fertile imagination and prodigious learning are on full display here. Not only will those seeking a thought-provoking philosophy of mythology find this book rewarding, but also readers with interest in the philosophy of history, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of religion will be quickened by Schelling's forays in these areas. The translators, who have also provided copious notes and a glossary, have provided a genuine service." -- Bernard Freydberg, author of Imagination in Kant's Critique of Practical Reason


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Schelling and the End of Idealism

Schelling and the End of Idealism
(Suny Series in Hegelian Studies)
by Dale E. Snow

Schelling is finally beginning to emerge from the long shadow cast by the eminence and influence of Hegel. This book demonstrates that, far from merely forming a step on the royal road to Hegel, it was Schelling who set the agenda for German Idealism and defined the terms of its characteristic problems. Ultimately, it was also Schelling who explored the possibility of idealistic system-building from within and thus brought an end to idealism.

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Schelling - The Grounding of Positive Philosophy: The Berlin Lectures

The Grounding of Positive Philosophy: The Berlin Lectures
(Suny Series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy, Suny Series in Hegelian Studies)
by Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling

The Berlin lectures in The Grounding of Positive Philosophy, appearing here for the first time in English, advance Schelling's final "existential system" as an alternative to modernity's reduction of philosophy to a purely formal science of reason. The onetime protege of Fichte and benefactor of Hegel, Schelling accuses German Idealism of dealing "with the world of lived experience just as a surgeon who promises to cure your ailing leg by amputating it." Schelling's appeal in Berlin for a positive, existential philosophy found an interested audience in Kierkegaard, Engels, Feuerbach, Marx, and Bakunin. His account of the ecstatic nature of existence and reason proved to be decisive for the work of Paul Tillich and Martin Heidegger. Also, Schelling's critique of reason's quixotic attempt at self-grounding anticipates similar criticisms leveled by poststructuralism, but without sacrificing philosophy's power to provide a positive account of truth and meaning. The Berlin lectures provide fascinating insight into the thought processes of one of the most provocative yet least understood thinkers of nineteenth-century German philosophy.

"Despite a strong resurgence of interest in his philosophy, Schelling's final Berlin lectures have remained unavailable to English-reading audiences. At long last, in Bruce Matthews's able hands, this lacuna has been remedied. This is a strong and rigorous translation of the inaugural lectures, which, along with Matthews's compelling and informative introduction, not only provides readers with a taste of these remarkable and unduly neglected lecture courses, but also provides an overview of Schelling's final project of positive philosophy and philosophical religion. These lectures are critical to a full appreciation of Schelling's accomplishments." -- Jason M. Wirth, author of The Conspiracy of Life: Meditations on Schelling and His Time

"With the publication of this translation, the last significant barrier to the reception of Schelling by the English-speaking philosophical community has been removed. As Bruce Matthews shows in his powerful introductory essay, Schelling's philosophical confrontation with Kant and Hegel gave birth to an utterly new and independent way of doing philosophy, one grounded not in the concept but in the intuition of existence itself." -- Joseph P. Lawrence, College of the Holy Cross

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Schelling - The Ages of the World

The Ages of the World:
(Fragment) from the Handwritten Remains, Third Version (C. 1815)
(Suny Series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy)
by Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling

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Schelling - First Outline of a System of the Philosophy of Nature

First Outline of a System of the Philosophy of Nature
(Contemporary Continental Philosophy)
by Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling

Appearing here in English for the first time, this is F. W. J. Schelling's vital document of the attempts of German Idealism and Romanticism to recover a deeper relationship between humanity and nature and to overcome the separation between mind and matter induced by the modern reductivist program. Written in 1799 and building upon his earlier work, First Outline of a System of the Philosophy of Nature provides the most inclusive exposition of Schelling's philosophy of the natural world. He presents a startlingly contemporary model of an expanding and contracting universe; a unified theory of electricity, gravity magnetism, and chemical forces; and, perhaps most importantly, a conception of nature as a living and organic whole

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Schelling - Clara: Or, on Nature's Connection to the Spirit World

Clara: Or, on Nature's Connection to the Spirit World
(Suny Series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy)
by Friedrich Wilhelm Joseph Von Schelling

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Nietzsche, Genealogy, Morality: Essays on Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals

Nietzsche, Genealogy, Morality: Essays on Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals (Philosophical Traditions)
by Richard Schacht (Editor)

Written at the height of the philosopher's intellectual powers, Friedrich Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals has become one of the key texts of recent Western philosophy. Its essayistic style affords a unique opportunity to observe many of Nietzsche's persisting concerns coming together in an illuminating constellation. A profound influence on psychoanalysis, antihistoricism, and poststructuralism and an abiding challenge to ethical theory, Nietzsche's book addresses many of the major philosophical problems and possibilities of modernity.
In this unique collection focusing on the Genealogy, twenty-five notable philosophers offer diverse discussions of the book's central themes and concepts. They explore such notions as ressentiment, asceticism, "slave" and "master" moralities, and what Nietzsche calls "genealogy" and its relation to other forms of inquiry in his work. The book presents a cross section of contemporary Nietzsche scholarship and philosophical investigation that is certain to interest philosophers, intellectual and cultural historians, and anyone concerned with one of the master thinkers of the modern age.

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Reinhold: Letters on the Kantian Philosophy

Reinhold: Letters on the Kantian Philosophy
(Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy)
by Karl Ameriks (Editor), James Hebbeler (Translator)

Reinhold's Letters on the Kantian Philosophy is arguably the most influential book ever written concerning Kant. It propelled Kant's Critical Philosophy, which had previously enjoyed an equivocal reception, into the central position which it has held to this day. It also brought fame to Reinhold, who became a professor at Jena and later developed his own "Elementary Philosophy". This volume presents the first English translation of the work, together with an introduction that sets it in its philosophical and historical contexts.

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Nietzsche's Anthropic Circle: Man, Science, and Myth

Nietzsche's Anthropic Circle: Man, Science, and Myth
(Rochester Studies in Philosophy)
by George J. Stack

Nietzsche's Anthropic Circle is an internal analysis and interpretation of Nietzsche's critical uncovering of "anthropomorphic truth" in language and science, as well as his later use of anthropic analogies and transferences in his imaginative perspectival interpretation "a hybrid of art and science" of a universal, immanent "will to power" in nature. Both the relationship of Nietzsche to Kant's analysis of knowledge in the Critique of Pure Reason and his absorption of a dynamic theory of nature are explored in some detail. A crucial distinction between Nietzsche's perspectival concept of knowledge and perspectival interpretation is thoroughly discussed against the background of recurring analyses of his critique of knowledge and truth. It is shown that instrumental fictionalism was adopted by Nietzsche in order to put in question the pure objectivism of science. This links an aspect of his thought to the domain of recent American philosophy of science. The anticipatory relationship between Nietzsche's proto-structuralist analysis of language and recent linguistic structuralism, as well as his affiliation with evolutionary epistemology is explored. In the concluding portion of this inquiry it is contended that Nietzsche's psychology of a will to power in human drives, thought and behavior is at least theoretically defensible. However, it must be segregated from the extension of a will to power to the cosmos. There is a strong concluding argument offered that seeks to demonstrate that the so-called 'metaphysics' of the will to power is an artfully constructed, exoteric fable designed to retrieve a sense of the humanization of the world in face of a de-anthropomorphic world picture. George Stack is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the State University College of New York at Brockport, and the author of several books dealing with the philosophy of Friedrich Nietzsche.

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Nazi Psychoanalysis I - II - III by Laurence A. Rickels

Nazi Psychoanalysis: Only Psychoanalysis Won the War
by Laurence A. Rickels

Psychoanalysis was a symptom of everything the Nazis reviled: an intellectual assault on Kultur largely perpetrated by Jews. It was also, as this remarkable revisionary work shows, an inescapable symptom of modernity, practiced, transformed, and perpetuated by and within the Nazi regime. A sweeping, magisterial work by one of the most incisive and interesting scholars of modern philosophy, theory, and culture, Nazi Psychoanalysis studies the breadth of this phenomenon in order to clarify and deepen our understanding not only of psychoanalysis but of the twentieth century itself.

Tracing the intersections of psychoanalysis and Nazism, Laurence A. Rickels discovers startling conjunctions and continuities in writers as diverse as Adler and Adorno, Kafka and Goethe, Lacan, H. Rider Haggard, and Heidegger, and in works as different as Der Golem, Civilization and Its Discontents, Frankenstein, Faust, and Brave New World. In a richly allusive style, he writes of psychoanalysis in multifarious incarnations, of the concept and actual history of "insurance," of propaganda in theory and practice, of psychological warfare, Walt Disney, and the Frankfurt School debates-a dizzying tour of the twentieth century that helps us see how the "corridor wars" that arise in the course of theoretical, clinical, social, political, and cultural attempts to describe the human psyche are related to the world wars of the century in an intimate and infinitely complicated manner.

Though some have used its appropriation by the Nazis to brand psychoanalysis with the political odium of fascism, Rickels instead finds an uncanny convergence-one that suggests far-reaching possibilities for both psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic criticism. His work, with its enormous intellectual and historical span, makes a persuasive argument that no element of modernity-not psychoanalysis any more than Marxism or deconstruction, cultural revolutions or technological advances-can be adequately understood without a thorough consideration of its Nazi component.

Laurence A. Rickels is professor of German and comparative literature at the University of California at Santa Barbara. His books include The Vampire Lectures (1999), The Case of California (2001), and the edited volume Acting Out in Groups (1999), all published by Minnesota.

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Kierkegaard's Concept of Existence

Kierkegaard's Concept of Existence
(Marquette Studies in Philosophy, #35.)
by Gregor Malantschuk

# Paperback: 330 pages
# Publisher: Marquette University Press (November 2003)

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Kierkegaard's Instant: On Beginnings by David J. Kangas

Kierkegaard's Instant: On Beginnings
(Studies in Continental Thought)
by David J. Kangas

In Kierkegaard's Instant, David J. Kangas reads Kierkegaard to reveal his radical thinking about temporality. For Kierkegaard, the instant of becoming, in which everything changes in the blink of an eye, eludes recollection and anticipation. It constitutes a beginning always already at work. As Kangas shows, Kierkegaard's retrieval of the sudden quality of temporality allows him to stage a deep critique of the idealist projects of Fichte, Schelling, and Hegel. By linking Kierkegaard's thought to the tradition of Meister Eckhart, Kangas formulates the central problem of these early texts and puts them into contemporary light--can thinking hold itself open to the challenges of temporality?

one of the best books ever written on kierkegaard

Evans - Kierkegaard on Faith and the Self: Collected Essays

Kierkegaard on Faith and the Self: Collected Essays
by C. Stephen Evans

A treasure trove from one of the world's finest Kierkegaard scholars. Fully sensitive to both the philosophical and theological dimensions of Kierkegaard's thought, Evans makes connections one will not find elsewhere. Like Kierkegaard's own writing, these essays are at once conceptually rigorous and spiritually up-building. --Merold Westphal, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Fordham University

This collection of nineteen essays by Steve Evans is a treasure trove of incisive analytic papers on topics ranging from Kierkegaard's approach to philosophy to an extended reformist reading that illuminates both Kierkegaard and Plantinga in addition to penetrating studies of Kierkegaard's views of ethics, authority, and philosophical psychology. An absolutely necessary volume for Kierkegaard scholars, it will prove quite important for others in adjacent philosophic disciplines. --Robert L. Perkins, Professor of Philosophy, Emeritus, at Stetson University and Editor, International Kierkegaard Commentary

A treasure trove from one of the world's finest Kierkegaard scholars. Fully sensitive to both the philosophical and theological dimensions of Kierkegaard's thought, Evans makes connections one will not find elsewhere. Like Kierkegaard's own writing, these essays are at once conceptually rigorous and spiritually up-building. --Merold Westphal, Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Fordham University

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Philosophies of Nature after Schelling

Philosophies of Nature after Schelling
(Transversals: New Directions in Philosophy)
by Iain Hamilton Grant

This book offers a lucid and crucial account of Schelling's major works in the philosophy of nature, now available in paperback.'The whole of modern European philosophy', wrote F.W.J. Schelling in 1809, 'has this common deficiency - that nature does not exist for it.' Despite repeated echoes of Schelling's assessment throughout the natural sciences, and despite the philosophy of nature recently proposed but not completed by Gilles Deleuze, "Philosophies of Nature After Schelling" argues that Schelling's verdict remains accurate two hundred years later. Presenting a lucid account of Schelling's major works in the philosophy of nature alongside those of his scientific contemporaries who pursued and furthered that work, this book does not simply aim to present Schelling's extravagant 'speculative physics' as an historical episode. Rather, Schelling's programme is presented as a viable and necessary corrective both to the rejection of metaphysics and the correlative 'antiphysics' at the ethical heart of contemporary philosophy.The series Editor Keith Ansell-Pearson, University of Warwick, and Consultant Board Eric Alliez, Richard Beardsworth, Howard Caygill, Gary Genosko, Elisabeth Grosz, Michael Hardt, Diane Morgan, John Mullarkey, Paul Pattion, Stanley Shotak, Isabelle Stengers, James Williams, David Wood Transversals explores the most exciting collisions within contemporary thought, as philosophy encounters nature, materiality, time, technology, science, culture, politics, art and everyday life. The series aims to present work that is both theoretically innovative and challenging, while retaining a commitment to rigor and clarity and to the power and precision of thought.

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Freedom and Reason in Kant, Schelling, and Kierkegaard

Freedom and Reason in Kant, Schelling, and Kierkegaard
by Michelle Kosch

Michelle Kosch examines the conceptions of free will and the foundations of ethics in the work of Kant, Schelling, and Kierkegaard. She seeks to understand the history of German idealism better by looking at it through the lens of these issues, and to understand Kierkegaard better by placing his thought in this context. Kosch argues for a new interpretation of Kierkegaard's theory of agency, that Schelling was a major influence and Kant a major target of criticism, and that both the theory and the criticisms are highly relevant to contemporary debates.

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Fink - Nietzsche's Philosophy

Nietzsche's Philosophy
(Athlone Contemporary European Thinkers Series)
by Eugen Fink

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On Being With Others: Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Derrida

On Being With Others: Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Derrida
by Sim Glendinning

On Being With Others is an outstanding and compelling work that uncovers one of the key questions in philosophy: how can we claim to have knowledge of minds other than our own? Simon Glendinning's fascinating analysis of this problem argues that it has polarized debate to such an extent that we do not know how to meet Wittgenstein's famous challenge that "to see the behavior of a living thing is to see its soul". This book sets out to discover whether Wittgenstein's remark can be justified by drawing on both the analytic and continental traditions.

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DURIGON - HERMENEUTICAL-PHILOSOPHICAL SKETCHES OF IN HEIDEGGER’S BEITRÄGE

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF THE PLATONIC TRADITION
*****
Trinity College Dublin
HEIDEGGER AND THE GREEKS:
HERMENEUTICAL-PHILOSOPHICAL SKETCHES OF
IGNORANCE, BLINDNESS AND NOT-BEING
IN HEIDEGGER’S BEITRÄGE
PLATO, PLOTINUS AND PROCLUS
by
ALBERT PETER DURIGON

ph.d thesis

Appropriating Heidegger

Appropriating Heidegger
by James E. Faulconer (Editor), Mark A. Wrathall (Editor)

Although Martin Heidegger is undeniably one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century, among the philosophers who study his work we find considerable disagreement over what might seem to be basic issues: why is Heidegger important? What did his work do? This volume is an explicit response to these differences, and is unique in bringing together representatives of many different approaches to Heidegger's philosophy. The essays discuss topics that are central to Heidegger's work, and the contributors also address the presuppositions which guide their understanding of Heidegger.

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Life and Death in Freud and Heidegger

Life and Death in Freud and Heidegger
(Contemporary Psychoanalytic Studies 6)
by Havi Carel

Life and Death in Freud and Heidegger argues that mortality is a fundamental structuring element in human life. The ordinary view of life and death regards them as dichotomous and separate. This book explains why this view is unsatisfactory and presents a new model of the relationship between life and death that sees them as interlinked. Using Heidegger’s concept of being towards death and Freud’s notion of the death drive, it demonstrates the extensive influence death has on everyday life and gives an account of its structural and existential significance. By bringing the two perspectives together, this book presents a reading of death that establishes its significance for life, creates a meeting point for philosophical and psychoanalytical perspectives, and examines the problems and strengths of each. It then puts forth a unified view, based on the strengths of each position and overcoming the problems of each. Finally, it works out the ethical consequences of this view. This volume is of interest for philosophers, mental health practitioners and those working in the field of death studies.

About the Author
Havi Carel is a Lecturer in Philosophy in the Faculty of Arts at the Australian National University. Her research interests include 20th Century German and French philosophy (in particular phenomenology), philosophy of psychology and psychoanalysis (especially Freud) and metaphysics. She is the co-editor of What Philosophy Is (London: Continuum, 2004) and the co-translator of The Order of Evils, by Adi Ophir (Zone Books: New York, 2005).

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Heidegger - GA 12: Unterwegszur Sprache

Heidegger - GA 12: Unterwegszur Sprache

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Heidegger - GA 23: GESCHICHTE DER PHILOSOPHIE VON THOMAS VON AQUIN BIS KANT

Heidegger - GA 23: GESCHICHTE DER PHILOSOPHIE VON THOMAS VON AQUIN BIS KANT

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Heidegger - GA 33: ARISTOTELES, METAPHYSIK theta 1-3

Heidegger - GA 33 - ARISTOTELES, METAPHYSIK theta 1-3

"Windless, starless night."

Heidegger - GA 40: EINFUHRUNG IN DIE METAPHYSIK

Heidegger - GA 40: EINFUHRUNG IN DIE METAPHYSIK

The Mood of Depression

You dark mouth inside me,
You are strong, shape
Composed of autumn cloud,
And golden evening stillness;
In the shadows thrown
By the broken pine trees
A mountain stream turns dark in the green light;
A little town
That piously dies away into brown pictures.

Now the black horses rear
In the foggy pasture.
I think of soldiers!
Down the hill, where the dying sun lumbers,
The laughing blood plunges,
Speechless
Under the oak trees! Oh the hopeless depression
Of an army; a blazing steel helmet
Fell with a clatter from purpled foreheads.

The autumn night comes down so coolly.
With her white habit glittering like the stars
Over the broken human bodies
The convent nurse is silent.

Trakl

Heidegger - GA 64: DER BEGRIFF DER ZEIT

Heidegger - GA 64: DER BEGRIFF DER ZEIT

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Heidegger - GA 65: BEITRAGE ZUR PHILOSOPHIE

Heidegger - GA 65: BEITRAGE ZUR PHILOSOPHIE


Forehead of the Rose

Despite the open window in the room of long absence, the odor of the rose is still linked with the breath that was there. Once again we are without previous experience, newcomers, in love. The rose! The field of its ways would dispel even the effrontery of death. No grating stands in the way. Desire is alive, an ache in our vaporous foreheads.

One who walks the earth in its rains has nothing to fear from the thorn in places either finished or unfriendly. But if he stops to commune with himself, woe! Pierced to the quick, he suddenly flies to ashes, an archer reclaimed by beauty.

René Char

Heidegger - GA 66: BESINNUNG

Heidegger - GA 66: BESINNUNG

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Heidegger - GA 8: WAS HEISST DENKEN

Heidegger - GA 8: WAS HEISST DENKEN

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Speaking Against Number: Heidegger, Language and the Politics of Calculation

Speaking Against Number: Heidegger, Language and the Politics of Calculation
(Taking on the Political)
by Stuart Elden

Elden should be applauded for writing with such sharp focus, while simultaneously never reducing the genuine complexity of Heidegger's thought. Elden is a careful scholar, who writes in a clear, accessible prose. He has identified all the important texts germane to his argument and provides a good rationale to the volume as proposed. -- Dr Laurence Hemming, Heythrop College, University of London I wholeheartedly recommend this book with its rich lode of expositions of Heidegger's texts on the political in its ancient, modern and postmodern manifestations. -- Professor Theodore Kisiel, Northern Illinois University Stuart Elden's Speaking Against Number takes full advantage of the most recent volumes of Heidegger's previously unpublished lectures and manuscripts to develop a rich new approach to his political thought. The resulting book should be widely read, especially by everyone who thinks they already know all there is to know about this topic. -- Professor Robert Bernasconi, University of Memphis This volume shows wide-ranging and sound scholarship. Elden has done a superior job of weaving together many important strands of Heidegger's thought. -- Richard Polt Continental Philosophy Review Elden should be applauded for writing with such sharp focus, while simultaneously never reducing the genuine complexity of Heidegger's thought. Elden is a careful scholar, who writes in a clear, accessible prose. He has identified all the important texts germane to his argument and provides a good rationale to the volume as proposed. I wholeheartedly recommend this book with its rich lode of expositions of Heidegger's texts on the political in its ancient, modern and postmodern manifestations. Stuart Elden's Speaking Against Number takes full advantage of the most recent volumes of Heidegger's previously unpublished lectures and manuscripts to develop a rich new approach to his political thought. The resulting book should be widely read, especially by everyone who thinks they already know all there is to know about this topic. This volume shows wide-ranging and sound scholarship. Elden has done a superior job of weaving together many important strands of Heidegger's thought.

link

Janicaud - On the Human Condition

On the Human Condition
by Dominique Janicaud (Author), Simon Critchley (Foreword), Eileen Brennan (Translator)

In an age of cloning, virtual reality and artificial intelligence what sort of future is in store for human beings? If it is a "posthuman" future as some predict, will it also be inhuman? On the Human Condition is a thought-provoking and profound reflection on where the idea of the human stands today. Dominique Janicaud argues that while we need to avoid apocalyptic talk of a posthuman condition, as embodied in technology such as cloning, we should neither fall back on a conservative humanism nor become technophobic. Drawing on topical examples such as genetic engineering, the mythology around the Frankenstein myth and the ideas of Pascal and Primo Levi, Dominique Janicaud urges us to acknowledge the fragile and provisional nature of being human. Above all, he argues that even if we do live in a world that is already posthuman, it is not a predicament we can confront alone and heroically, but must share with others.

link

Sunday, November 23, 2008

FREE THE TARNAC 9 + A statement of support by Giorgio Agamben



This e-mail is from semiotext(e).

[note about the blog: due to my busy engagements I couldn't post anything for 2 months, I'll post a 50 book set sometime in this week.]



Nine friends in France have been arrested and accused of terrorism, although no proof has been brought against them. Attached please find a petition written by the publisher Eric Hazan, which can be signed (name, occupation, city) and returned to: lafabrique@lafabrique.fr

A statement of support by Giorgio Agamben is pasted in below.

Thanks very much.


TERRORISM OR TRAGICOMEDY?

On the morning of November 11, 150 police officers, most of which belonged to the anti-terrorist brigades, surrounded a village of 350 inhabitants on the Millevaches plateau, before raiding a farm in order to arrest nine young people (who ran the local grocery store and tried to revive the cultural life of the village). Four days later, these nine people were sent before an anti-terrorist judge and “accused of criminal conspiracy with terrorist intentions.” The newspapers reported that the Ministry of the Interior and the Secretary of State “had congratulated local and state police for their diligence.” Everything is in order, or so it would appear. But let’s try to examine the facts a little more closely and grasp the reasons and the results of this “diligence.”

First the reasons: the young people under investigation “were tracked by the police because they belonged to the ultra-left and the anarcho autonomous milieu.” As the entourage of the Ministry of the Interior specifies, “their discourse is very radical and they have links with foreign groups.” But there is more: certain of the suspects “participate regularly in political demonstrations,” and, for example, “in protests against the Fichier Edvige (Exploitation Documentaire et Valorisation de l'Information Générale) and against the intensification of laws restricting immigration.” So political activism (this is the only possible meaning of linguistic monstrosities such as “anarcho autonomous milieu”) or the active exercise of political freedoms, and employing a radical discourse are therefore sufficient reasons to call in the anti-terrorist division of the police (SDAT) and the central intelligence office of the Interior (DCRI). But anyone possessing a minimum of political consc
ience could not help sharing the concerns of these young people when faced with the degradations of democracy entailed by the Fichier Edvige, biometrical technologies and the hardening of immigration laws.

As for the results, one might expect that investigators found weapons, explosives and Molotov cocktails on the farm in Millevaches. Far from it. SDAT officers discovered “documents containing detailed information on railway transportation, including exact arrival and departure times of trains.” In plain French: an SNCF train schedule. But they also confiscated “climbing gear.” In simple French: a ladder, such as one might find in any country house.

Now let’s turn our attention to the suspects and, above all, to the presumed head of this terrorist gang, “a 33 year old leader from a well-off Parisian background, living off an allowance from his parents.” This is Julien Coupat, a young philosopher who (with some friends) formerly published Tiqqun, a journal whose political analyses – while no doubt debatable – count among the most intelligent of our time. I knew Julien Coupat during that period and, from an intellectual point of view, I continue to hold him in high esteem.

Let’s move on and examine the only concrete fact in this whole story. The suspects’ activities are supposedly connected with criminal acts against the SNCF that on November 8 caused delays of certain TGV trains on the Paris-Lille line. The devices in question, if we are to believe the declarations of the police and the SNCF agents themselves, can in no way cause harm to people: they can, in the worst case, hinder communications between trains causing delays. In Italy, trains are often late, but so far no one has dreamed of accusing the national railway of terrorism. It’s a case of minor offences, even if we don’t condone them. On November 13, a police report prudently affirmed that there are perhaps “perpetrators among those in custody, but it is not possible to attribute a criminal act to any one of them.”

The only possible conclusion to this shadowy affair is that those engaged in activism against the (in any case debatable) way social and economic problems are managed today are considered ipso facto as potential terrorists, when not even one act can justify this accusation. We must have the courage to say with clarity that today, numerous European countries (in particular France and Italy), have introduced laws and police measures that we would previously have judged barbaric and anti-democratic, and that these are no less extreme than those put into effect in Italy under fascism. One such measure authorizes the detention for ninety-six hours of a group of young – perhaps careless – people, to whom “it is not possible to attribute a criminal act.” Another, equally serious, is the adoption of laws that criminalize association, the formulations of which are left intentionally vague and that allow the classification of political acts as having terrorist “intentions” or “inclinat
ions,” acts that until now were never in themselves considered terrorist.

— Giorgio Agamben
Libération, November 19, 2008

ATTACHMENTS THAT CAME WITH THE MAIL
photo by koudelka (it is there, in the event's haunting we are -a community, we remember- experiencing a particular twilight. we are the threshold of resistance [bauman "modernity and the holocaust"] to stop this)

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

German Idealism: "For a god, knowing always the proper measure"


"No power will again be suppressed, then general freedom and equality will reign among spirits! – A higher spirit, sent from heaven, must found this new religion among us, it will be the last, greatest task of humanity." Hölderlin

Yes, I'm bored of french theory. deutschland über alles. anyway. as long as this is modernity, the determination of "as" firstly touches what does not come before it, the void that led the sentence to appear. that is why a german issue issued itself.

note that a 15 book schelling issue is next and there will be a suprise for all, a new schelling pdf that I made. have a nice summer! sun shines! hölderlin sings! this belated romantic suffers!

have a look at salvatore puglia. a unique encounter with his work: Christopher Fynsk' "Infant Figures"

edit: relevant titles which are posted already:
[new link] JL Nancy & Lacoue-Labarthe - The Literary Absolute -- The Theory Of Literature In German Romanticism

FICHTE
Fichte - The Science of Rights
Fichte: The System of Ethics
The Science Of Knowing: J.g. Fichte's 1804 Lectures On The Wissenschaftslehre

Schiller as Philosopher: A Re-Examination
by Frederick Beiser

Hegel
(The Routledge Philosophers)
by Frederick Beiser

The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism
(Cambridge Companions to Philosophy)
by Karl Ameriks (Editor)

Classic and Romantic German Aesthetics
(Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy)
by J. M. Bernstein (Editor)

Challenges to German Idealism: Schelling, Fichte and Kant
by Kyriaki Goudeli

German Philosophy 1760-1860: The Legacy of Idealism
by Terry Pinkard

The German Aesthetic Tradition
by Kai Hammermeister

The Discovery of Historicity in German Idealism and Historism
(Studies in Economic Ethics and Philosophy)
by Peter Koslowski (Editor)

Contagion: Sexuality, Disease, and Death in German Idealism and Romanticism
(Studies in Continental Thought)
by David F. Krell

Nietzsche and the German Tradition

The Philosopher's Voice: Philosophy, Politics, and Language in the Nineteenth Century
(Suny Series in Philosophy)
by Andrew G. Fiala

The Philosophical Foundations of Early German Romanticism
(Intersections: Philosophy and Critical Theory)
by Manfred Frank

Philosophy and Religion in German Idealism
(Studies in German Idealism)



German Idealism: Contemporary Perspectives
by Espen Hammer

Romantic Atheism: Poetry and Freethought, 1780-1830
(Cambridge Studies in Romanticism)
by Martin Priestman

Berlin Electropolis: Shock, Nerves, and German Modernity
(Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism)
by Andreas Killen

Romantic Genius and the Literary Magazine Biography, Celebrity, Politics
(Routledge Studies in Romanticism)
by David Higgins

The Rhetoric of Romanticism
by Paul de Man




Hölderlin sath:
For a god, knowing always the proper measure,
Touches sparingly and just for a moment the homes
Of men — unexpectedly, and no one knows when.
But then something boisterous may appear,
And wildness may come to the holy place from afar.
Grasping about roughly, it touches upon madness,
And fills some intention thereby.
Gratitude doesn't follow the gift
From the gods immediately:
It has to be deeply studied first.
For if the giver hadn't been cautious,
From the blessing of the hearth both
Floor and ceiling would have gone up in flames.

Fichte - The Science of Rights


SCIENCE OF RIGHTS
Grundlage des Naturrech~ nach
Principien der Wissenschaftslehre
J. G. FICHTE
T R A N S L A T E D FROM T H E GERMAN
BY
A. E. KROEGER
WITH A PREFACE BY
W I L L I A M T. H A R R I S



link

Challenges to German Idealism: Schelling, Fichte and Kant


Challenges to German Idealism: Schelling, Fichte and Kant
by Kyriaki Goudeli

# Hardcover: 224 pages
# Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (January 15, 2003)

This book offers an important reappraisal of Schelling's philosophy and his relationship to German Idealism. Focusing on Schelling's self-critique in early identity philosophy the author rejects those criticisms of Schelling made by both Hegel and Heidegger. This work significantly redraws the boundaries of metaphysical thinking, arguing for a dialogue between rational philosophy, mythology and cosmology.

link

German Philosophy 1760-1860: The Legacy of Idealism


German Philosophy 1760-1860: The Legacy of Idealism
by Terry Pinkard

# Paperback: 392 pages
# Publisher: Cambridge University Press (September 16, 2002)

Published a little more than two years ago, Pinkard's Hegel: A Biography has quickly become the standard life in English of the world's major Romantic-era philosopher, not least because of its magisterial explications of the finer points of Hegel's thought, along with its extremely forthright judiciousness about the life. To have another work from Pinkard, professor of philosophy at Northwestern University, in so short a time is remarkable. Pinkard takes readers-carefully, succinctly and in a manner sensitive to the political and social ferment of the time-on a journey through the most important hundred years in philosophy since the Renaissance. Beginning with the Kantian revolution in human understanding of its own knowledge (the ethical and political consequences that result from it), Pinkard walks readers through the philosophical chaos that reigned through the 1790s, when Hegel was at university with Halderlin and Schelling and the German states were in upheaval, through to Hegel's "completion" of Kant's project (announced with 1807's Phenomenology of Spirit) and Schopenhauer's version of idealism (mirrored in Kierkegaard's pessimism). In Pinkard's hands, what could be just names come alive as men and ideas that have much to teach us about our own beliefs about how to live. As he writes of Hegel's phenomenology, "it was to provide an education, a bildung, a formation for its readership so that they could grasp who they had become (namely, a people individually and collectively `called' to be free), why they had become those people, and why that had been necessary."


link

Berlin Electropolis: Shock, Nerves, and German Modernity

Berlin Electropolis: Shock, Nerves, and German Modernity
(Weimar and Now: German Cultural Criticism)
by Andreas Killen

# Hardcover: 303 pages
# Publisher: University of California Press; 1 edition (January 16, 2006)

Berlin Electropolis ties the German discourse on nervousness in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to Berlin's transformation into a capital of the second industrial revolution. Focusing on three key groups--railway personnel, soldiers, and telephone operators--Andreas Killen traces the emergence in the 1880s and then later decline of the belief that modernity caused nervous illness. During this period, Killen explains, Berlin became arguably the most advanced metropolis in Europe. A host of changes, many associated with breakthroughs in technologies of transportation, communication, and leisure, combined to radically alter the shape and tempo of everyday life in Berlin. The resulting consciousness of accelerated social change and the shocks and afflictions that accompanied it found their consummate expression in the discourse about nervousness.
Wonderfully researched and clearly written, this book offers a wealth of new insights into the nature of the modern metropolis, the psychological aftermath of World War I, and the operations of the German welfare state. Killen also explores cultural attitudes toward electricity, the evolution of psychiatric thought and practice, and the status of women workers in Germany's rapidly industrializing economy. Ultimately, he argues that the backlash against the welfare state that occurred during the late Weimar Republic brought about the final decoupling of modernity and nervous illness.

From the Inside Flap
"Berlin Electropolis is the first English-language history of neurasthenia or of nerves in the German context. However, the author does more than just narrate the history of this central, yet puzzling malady; he discusses the construction, maintenance, and ultimate unraveling of a cultural assumption, by which modernity and progress were seen as creating nervous pathology. Killen introduces readers to a great deal of fascinating material and forges new connections between science, culture and society."--Paul Lerner, author of Hysterical Men: War, Psychiatry, and the Politics of Trauma in Germany, 1890-1930

link

Romantic Atheism: Poetry and Freethought, 1780-1830


Romantic Atheism: Poetry and Freethought, 1780-1830
(Cambridge Studies in Romanticism)
by Martin Priestman

# Paperback: 324 pages
# Publisher: Cambridge University Press; 1 edition (November 2, 2006)

Romantic Atheism explores the links between English Romantic poetry and the first burst of outspoken atheism in Britain, from the 1780s onward. Martin Priestman examines the work of Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Shelley, Byron and Keats in their most intellectually radical periods, as well as a host of less canonical poet-intellectuals and controversialists of the time. Above all, the book conveys the excitement of Romantic atheism, whose dramatic appeals to new developments in politics, science and comparative mythology lent it a protean energy belied by the more recent conception of "loss of faith."

mirror rim

Philosophy and Religion in German Idealism


Philosophy and Religion in German Idealism
(Studies in German Idealism)

by William Desmond (Editor), Ernst-Otto Onnasch (Editor), Paul Cruysberghs (Editor)

# Hardcover: 175 pages
# Publisher: Springer; 1 edition (October 29, 2004)

This volume comprises studies written by prominent scholars working in the field of German Idealism. These scholars come from the English speaking philosophical world and Continental Europe. They treat major aspects of the place of religion in Idealism, Romanticism and other schools of thought and culture. They also discuss the tensions and relations between religion and philosophy in terms of the specific form they take in German Idealism, and in terms of the effect they still have on contemporary culture. The authors consider figures such as Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Jacobi.
The book will prove very informative to researchers and teachers working in the fields of philosophy, philosophy of religion, and classical German philosophy.

ya o değil de muhy-i gülşeni'ninin menakıb'ını buldum sahafta

The Philosophical Foundations of Early German Romanticism



The Philosophical Foundations of Early German Romanticism
(Intersections: Philosophy and Critical Theory)
by Manfred Frank

Elizabeth Millan-Zaibert (Translator)

Often portrayed as a movement of poets lost in swells of passion, early German Romanticism has been generally overlooked by scholars in favor of the great system-builders of the post-Kantian period, Schelling and Hegel. In the twelve lectures collected here, Manfred Frank redresses this oversight, offering an in-depth exploration of the philosophical contributions and contemporary relevance of early German Romanticism. Arguing that the early German Romantics initiated an original movement away from idealism, Frank brings the leading figures of the movement, Fredrich Schlegel and Friedrich von Hardenberg (Novalis), into concert with contemporary philosophical developments, and explores the role that Friedrich Hölderlin and other members of the Homberg Circle had upon the development of early German Romantic philosophy.

zahit bizi tan eyleme

The Philosopher's Voice: Philosophy, Politics, and Language in the Nineteenth Century


The Philosopher's Voice: Philosophy, Politics, and Language in the Nineteenth Century
(Suny Series in Philosophy)
by Andrew G. Fiala

# Hardcover: 352 pages
# Publisher: State University of New York Press (October 2002)

This analysis of the relationship between philosophy and politics recognizes that political philosophers must continually struggle to distinguish their voices from others that clamor within political life. Author Andrew Fiala asks whether it is possible to maintain a distinction between philosophical speech and other political and poetic language. His answer is that philosophy distinguishes itself from politics by its methodological self-consciousness of the nature of its voice. By focusing on the different ways in which this methodological norm was enacted in the lives and work of Kant, Fichte, Hegel, and Marx, the author puts the problem in a larger context and considers the roles that these thinkers played in the political history of the nineteenth century. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

link

ellen burgin - I scream, you scream

de Man - The Rhetoric of Romanticism


The Rhetoric of Romanticism
by Paul de Man

# Paperback: 327 pages
# Publisher: Columbia University Press (April 15, 1984)

link

Nietzsche and the German Tradition


Nietzsche and the German Tradition

by Nicholas Martin (Editor), Christa Davis Acampora (Contributor), Thomas H. Brobjer (Contributor), Daniel W. Conway (Contributor), Malcolm Humble (Contributor), Friedrich Nietzsche Society Conference 1997 University of St. andrews (Corporate Author)

# Paperback: 314 pages
# Publisher: Peter Lang Publishing (December 2003)

Nietzsche and the German Tradition. To those persuaded that Nietzsche is the anti-German, antitraditional thinker par excellence, this title may well appear contradictory. Just how potentially contradictory (but also fruitful) it is, can be gauged by recasting it as a series of questions, emphasising each word in turn: Nietzsche and the German Tradition? Nietzsche and the German Tradition?
Nietzsche and the German Tradition? Nietzsche and the German Tradition? Nietzsche and the German Tradition?

link

Krell - Contagion: Sexuality, Disease, and Death in German Idealism and Romanticism


Contagion: Sexuality, Disease, and Death in German Idealism and Romanticism
(Studies in Continental Thought)
by David F. Krell

# Paperback: 243 pages
# Publisher: Indiana University Press (April 1998)

Among all poisons, the soul is the most potent.
—NOVALIS, DAS ALLGEMEINE BROUILLON, 2: 706

Every substance can become a poison. For only through
the activity of an organism does a substance become poisonous.
—SCHELL1NG, ERSTER ENTWURF, 73

The living is something fixed and determined in-and-for-itself
Whatever it touches chemically on the outside is immediately
transformed by this contact. . .. The living immediately poisons
this other, transforms it, as spirit does when it intuits something,
transforming it and making it its own. For that something
is its representation.
—HEGEL, ENZYKLOPÄDIE, 9:402-403

captain krell is here!

The Discovery of Historicity in German Idealism and Historism


The Discovery of Historicity in German Idealism and Historism
(Studies in Economic Ethics and Philosophy)
by Peter Koslowski (Editor)

# Hardcover: 293 pages
# Publisher: Springer; 1 edition (April 19, 2005)

believe me this volume is very good

The German Aesthetic Tradition


The German Aesthetic Tradition
by Kai Hammermeister

# Paperback: 259 pages
# Publisher: Cambridge University Press (November 4, 2002)


"This is a timely, useful, and compelling synthesis of important themes in German philosophical aesthetic thought. Recommended." Choice

"What Hammermeister inevitably achieves in this compact, yet wonderfully rich, book is much more than a scholarly overview of an important and difficult historical tradition in aesthetic philosophy." Philosophy and Literature

Product Description
This is the only available systematic critical overview of German aesthetics from 1750 to the present. The book begins with the work of Baumgarten and covers all the major writers on German aesthetics that follow: Kant, Schiller, Schelling, Hegel, Nietzsche, Heidegger, Gadamer and Adorno. It offers a clear and non-technical exposition of ideas, placing these in a wider philosophical context where necessary. Interest in this book extends far beyond the discipline of philosophy to those of literary studies, fine art and music.


link

Romantic Genius and the Literary Magazine Biography, Celebrity, Politics


Romantic Genius and the Literary Magazine Biography, Celebrity, Politics
(Routledge Studies in Romanticism)
by David Higgins

# Hardcover: 192 pages
# Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (October 19, 2005)

In early nineteenth-century Britain, there was unprecedented interest in the subject
of genius, as well as in the personalities and private lives of creative artists. This was also a period in which literary magazines were powerful arbiters of taste, helping to shape the ideological consciousness of their middle-class readers. Romantic Genius and the Literary Magazine considers how these magazines debated the nature of genius and how and why they constructed particular creative artists as geniuses. Romantic writers often imagined genius to be a force that transcended the
realms of politics and economics. David Higgins, however, shows in this text that
representations of genius played an important role in ideological and commercial
conflicts within early nineteenth-century literary culture. Romantic Genius and the
Literary Magazine also bridges the gap between Romantic and Victorian literary history by considering the ways in which Romanticism was understood and sometimes
challenged by writers in the 1830s. It not only discusses a wide range of canonical and non-canonical authors, but also examines the various structures in which these authors had to operate, making it an interesting and important book for anyone working on Romantic literature.

David Higgins is a Lecturer in English at the University of Chester, and has
published articles on Wordsworth, Hazlitt and nineteenth-century constructions
of race.

link

German Idealism: Contemporary Perspectives


German Idealism: Contemporary Perspectives
by Espen Hammer

# Hardcover: 339 pages
# Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (September 7, 2007)

German Idealism is one of the most important movements in the history of
philosophy. It is also increasingly acknowledged to contain the seeds of many
current philosophical issues and debates. This outstanding collection of specially
commissioned chapters examines German idealism from several angles
and assesses the renewed interest in the subject from a wide range of fields.
Including discussions of the key representatives of German idealism such as
Kant, Fichte and Hegel, it is structured in clear sections dealing with:
 metaphysics
 the legacy of Hegel’s philosophy
 Brandom and Hegel
 recognition and agency
 autonomy and nature
 the philosophy of German romanticism
Amongst other important topics, German Idealism: Contemporary Perspectives
addresses the debates surrounding the metaphysical and epistemological legacy
of German idealism; its importance for understanding recent debates in moral
and political thought; its appropriation in recent theories of language and the
relationship between mind and world; and how German idealism affected subsequent
movements such as romanticism, pragmatism, and critical theory.
Contributors: Frederick Beiser, Jay Bernstein, Andrew Bowie, Richard
Eldridge, Manfred Frank, Paul Franks, Sebastian Gardner, Espen Hammer,
Stephen Houlgate, Terry Pinkard, Robert Pippin, Paul Redding, Fred Rush,
Robert Stern.
Espen Hammer is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Oslo and a
Reader in Philosophy at the University of Essex. He is the author of Adorno
and the Political (Routledge, 2006).

link

Fichte: The System of Ethics


Fichte: The System of Ethics
(Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy)
by Johann Gottlieb Fichte

Daniel Breazeale (Editor), Guenter Zöller (Editor)


# Hardcover: 446 pages
# Publisher: Cambridge University Press (December 19, 2005)

Fichte's System of Ethics, published in 1798, is the most accessible presentation of its author's comprehensive philosophical project, The Science of Knowledge or Wissenschaftslehre, and the most important work in moral philosophy written between Kant and Hegel. Fichte's ethics integrates the discussion of our moral duties into the systematic framework of a transcendental theory of the human subject, and ranges over a number of important philosophical themes. This volume offers a new translation of the work together with an introduction that sets it in its philosophical and historical contexts.

link

The Science Of Knowing: J.g. Fichte's 1804 Lectures On The Wissenschaftslehre


The Science Of Knowing: J.g. Fichte's 1804 Lectures On The Wissenschaftslehre
(S U N Y Series in Contemporary Continental Philosophy)
by Johann Gottlieb Fichte

Walter E. Wright (Translator)

# Paperback: 260 pages
# Publisher: State University of New York Press (September 30, 2005)

link

Classic and Romantic German Aesthetics


Classic and Romantic German Aesthetics
(Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy)
by J. M. Bernstein (Editor)

# Paperback: 356 pages
# Publisher: Cambridge University Press (January 13, 2003)

This volume brings together major works by German thinkers, writing just prior to and after Kant, who were enormously influential in this crucial period of aesthetics. They include the first translation into English of Schiller's Kallias Letters and Moritz's On the Artistic Imitation of the Beautiful, and new translations of some of Hölderlin's most important theoretical writings and works by Hamann, Lessing, Novalis and Schlegel. The volume also offers an introduction in which J. M. Bernstein places the works in their historical and philosophical context.

wonderful hölderlin translations noli me legere

link

Cambridge Companion to German Idealism


The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism
(Cambridge Companions to Philosophy)
by Karl Ameriks (Editor)

# Hardcover: 322 pages
# Publisher: Cambridge University Press (November 6, 2000)


"The Cambridge Companion is an excellent supplement to those on Kant, Hegel, and Fichte." Choice

"This is essential reading for students and scholars of the most productive period in continental philosophy... the majority offer in-depth, jargon-free, authoritative treatments of central issues." Allegra De Laurentis, Philosophical Inquiry

"...this collection is a must-have for anyone interested in this period; it will certainly serve as a wise and illuminating companion for those coming to grips with the daunting texts of that time." Book Notes

"The contributions to this volume offer a rich, detailed, and in some respects innovative and remarkable account of that uniquely fecund and philosophically revolutionary epoch known as German Idealism." The Philosophical Review

"The Cambridge Companion is an excellent supplement to those on Kant, Hegel, and Fichte." Choice

Product Description
The Cambridge Companion to German Idealism offers a comprehensive, penetrating, and informative guide to what is regarded as the classical period of German philosophy. The essays in the volume trace and explore the unifying themes of German Idealism, and discuss their relationship to Romanticism, the Enlightenment, and the culture of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century Europe. The result is an illuminating overview of a rich and complex philosophical movement that will appeal to a wide range of readers in philosophy, German studies, theology, literature, and the history of ideas.

link

Beiser - Hegel


Hegel
(The Routledge Philosophers)
by Frederick Beiser

# Paperback: 353 pages
# Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (June 13, 2005)

Hegel (1770-1831) is one of the towering philosophers of the nineteenth century. Many of the major philosophical movements of the twentieth century--from existentialism to analytic philosophy -- also grew out of reactions against Hegel. He is also one of the hardest philosophers to understand and his complex ideas, though rewarding, are often misunderstood.

In this magisterial and lucid introduction, Frederick Beiser covers every major aspect of Hegel's thought. He places Hegel in the historical context in nineteenth century Germany while clarifying the deep insights and originality of Hegel's philosophy.

About the Author
Frederick Beiser is Professor of Philosophy at Syracuse University. He has also taught at many universities, including Harvard, Yale, Indiana and Wisconsin. He is the author of The Fate of Reason, German Idealism and is editor of The Cambridge Companion to Hegel.

aloha

Beiser - Schiller as Philosopher: A Re-Examination


Schiller as Philosopher: A Re-Examination
by Frederick Beiser

Review
`Review from previous edition a carefully researched, meticulously documented, and clearly written account of one of the insufficiently appreciated philosophical thinkers of the eighteenth century' Christopher Adair-Toteff, British Journal for the History of Philosophy

`...by taking Schiller seriously as a philosopher Beiser succeeds in revealing the subtlety of his thought and mounts a persuasive case against the narrow representation of his ideas in contemporary Kant scholarship.' Jason Gaiger, The Philosophers' Magazine

`the author has done a tremendous job of reintroducing Schiller and his philosophy to the modern world' Brad Eden, Consciousness, Literature and the Arts

`Beiser's approach and even his arguments mirror the deeply unsettled character of Schiller's thought itself.' Robert E Norton, Times Literary Supplement

Product Description
Fred Beiser, renowned as one of the world's leading historians of German philosophy, presents a brilliant new study of Friedrich von Schiller (1759-1805), rehabilitating him as a philosopher worthy of serious attention. Beiser shows, in particular, that Schiller's engagement with Kant is far more subtle and rewarding than is often portrayed. Promising to be a landmark in the study of German thought, Schiller as Philosopher will be compulsory reading for any philosopher, historian, or literary scholar engaged with the key developments of this fertile period.

link

Thursday, July 24, 2008

A Call to Habermas

Habermas vs Foucault - Is Modernity an Incomplete Project?

I laughed a lot, what do you think?

Sunday, July 20, 2008

France: à bout de souffle


Hardt writes in political thought in italy's opening lines:

In Marx's time revolutiionary thought seemed to rely on three axes: german philosophy, english economics and french politics. In our time axes shiftedso that if we remain the same euro-american framework, revolutionary thinking might be said to draw on french philosophy, U.S. economics and italian politics.


I will try to provide books in this milieu. there will be several issues on french's post-war flourishing.

I tried to bring leading intellectuals' responses together to the new world of post-45 capitalism and socialism. here we have lyotard, barthes, baudrillard, de Certeau, Castoriadis .

two books on movements: Ffrench's book on Tel Quel which is one of the most original editorials of the century. the other is on existential marxism book, it would be helpful for you to read generation existential for a better understanding of Heidegger's conquest.

Contemporary French Philosophy: Modernity And The Persistence Of The Subject & Biography and the Question of Literature in France are very rich books indeed both questioning the agency which was probably the most prominent subject matter in an age when capitalism asserted itself as nature.

some books on early modern france. some music. too much boredom (kracacuer!)

that is all. istanbul is too hot. sorry for making you wait too much. adieu.

artwork: Salvatore Puglia - L'Art de la radiographie

türkçe bilenlere: cumhuriyetimize gelsin: ...dan sonra

The Possessed Individual: Technology and the French Postmodern



The Possessed Individual: Technology and the French Postmodern
by Arthur Kroker

# Paperback: 250 pages
# Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (December 15, 1991)

Taking as his starting point the failure of Sartre and Camus to resolve the problem of individual freedom and public duty, Kroker surveys French postmodernist theory as an approach to understanding the relationship between politics and technology in North America. The work of Virilio, Baudrillard, Barthes, Deleuze, Guattari, Lyotard, and Foucault offers both an analysis and an indictment of the cynical reason underlying terminal culture. Influenced by Peter Sloterdijk's Critique of Cynical Reason, this is a suggestive, if at times facile, fluent, and occasionally trendy, introduction to the French postmodernist thinkers and their importance to understanding modern so ciety.

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[a novel in turkish "I loved a postmodern girl"]

The Image in French Philosophy


The Image in French Philosophy
(Consciousness, Literature and the Arts 5) (Conciousness Literture and the Arts)
by Temenuga Trifonova

# Paperback: 316 pages
# Publisher: Editions Rodopi BV (February 28, 2007)

'The Image in French Philosophy' challenges dominant interpretations of Bergson, Sartre, Lyotard, Baudrillard and Deleuze by arguing that their philosophy was not a critique but a 'revival' of metaphysics as a thinking pertaining to impersonal forces and distinguished by an aversion to subjectivity and an aversion of the philosophical gaze away from the discourse of vision, and thus away from the image. Insofar as the image was part of the discourse of subjectivity/representation, getting rid of the subject involved smuggling the concept of the image out of the discourse of subjectivity/representation into a newly revived and ethically flavored metaphysical discourse - a metaphysics of immanence, which was more interested in consciousness rather than subjectivity, in the inhuman rather than the human, in the virtual rather than the real, in Time rather than temporalization, in Memory rather than memory-images, in Imagination rather than images, in sum, in 'impersonal' forces, de-personalizing experiences, states of dis-embodiment characterized by the breaking down of sensory-motor schemata (Bergson's pure memory, Sartre's image-consciousness, Deleuze's time-image) or, more generally, in that which remains beyond representation i.e. 'beyond' subjectivity (Lyotard's sublime, Baudrillard's fatal object). The book would be of interest to scholars and students of philosophy, aesthetics, and film theory. Contents -- Introduction: The New Metaphysics of Immanence -- Bergson's Matter-Image: The Degradation of the Impersonal -- Sartre's Image-Consciousness: The Allergic Reaction to Matter -- Lyotard's Sublime: The Ontologization of the Image -- Baudrillard's Simulacrum: The End of Visibility -- Deleuze's Time-Image: Getting Rid of Ourselves -- Imaginary Time in Contemporary Cinema -- Bibliography -- Index

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Popular Music in Contemporary France: Authenticity, Politics, Debate


Popular Music in Contemporary France: Authenticity, Politics, Debate
(Berg French Studies Series)
by David L. Looseley

# Paperback: 256 pages
# Publisher: Berg Publishers (March 1, 2003)

While music lovers from all over the world have tried to recreate the ambience of French cafés by playing music from stars such as Piaf, Trénet and Chevalier, intellectuals, sociologists and policy makers in France have been embroiled in passionate debate about just what constitutes 'real' French music. In the late 1950s and 1960s a wave of Anglo-American rock 'n' roll and pop hit Europe and disrupted French popular music forever. The cherished sounds of the chanson were sidelined, fragmented or merged with pop styles and instrumentation. From this point on, French music and music culture have been splintered into cultural divides - pop culture vs high culture; mass culture vs 'authentic' popular culture; national culture vs Americanization. This book investigates the exciting and innovative segmentation of the French music scene and the debates it has spawned. From an analysis of the chanson as national myth, to pop, rap, techno and the State, this book is the first full-length study to make sense of the complexity behind the history of French popular music and its relation to 'authentic' cultural identity.

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Political Writings by Lyotard


Political Writings
by Jean-Francois Lyotard

Bill Readings, Kevin Paul Geiman (Translator)

# Paperback: 352 pages
# Publisher: University of Minnesota Press (June 1993)

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Fallen Nature, Fallen Selves: Early Modern French Thought II



Fallen Nature, Fallen Selves: Early Modern French Thought II
by Michael Moriarty

# Hardcover: 448 pages
# Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA (July 27, 2006)

From the late sixteenth to the late seventeenth centuries, French writing is especially concerned with analyzing human nature. The ancient ethical vision of man's nature and goal (we achieve fulfillment by living our lives according to reason, the highest and noblest element of our nature) survives, even, to some extent, in Descartes. But it is put into question especially by the revival of St. Augustine's thought, which focuses on the contradictions and disorders of human desires and aspirations. Analyses of behavior display a powerful suspicion of appearances. Human beings are increasingly seen as motivated by self-love: they are driven by the desire for their own advantage, and take a narcissistic delight in their own image. Moral and religious writers re-emphasize the traditional imperative of self-knowledge, but in such a way as to suggest the difficulties of knowing oneself. Operating with the Cartesian distinction between mind and body, they emphasize the imperceptible influence of bodily processes on our thought and attitudes. They analyze human beings' ignorance (due to self-love) of their own motives and qualities, and the illusions under which they live their lives. Their critique of human behavior is no less searching than that of writers who have broken with traditional religious morality, such as Hobbes and Spinoza. A wide range of authors is studied, some well-known, others much less so: the abstract and general analyses of philosophers and theologians (Descartes, Jansenius, Malebranche) are juxtaposed with the less systematic and more concrete investigations of writers like Montaigne and La Rochefoucauld, not to mention the theatre of Corneille, Moliere, and Racine.

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moriarty

France since 1945



France since 1945
by Robert Gildea

# Paperback: 368 pages
# Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA; Updated edition (May 2, 2002)

The last fifty years of French history have seen immense challenges for the French: constructing a new European order, building a modern economy, searching for a stable political system. It has also been a time of anxiety and doubt. The French have had to come to terms with the legacy of the German Occupation, the loss of Empire, the political and social implications of the influx of foreign immigrants, the rise of Islam, the destruction of rural life, and the threat of Anglo-American culture to French language and civilization.

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The Time of Theory: A History of Tel Quel (1960-1983)


The Time of Theory: A History of Tel Quel (1960-1983)
by Patrick Ffrench

# Hardcover: 320 pages
# Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA (January 25, 1996)

This is the first full-length study in any language of one of the most important elements in post-war French intellectual and cultural life. The journal Tel Quel was the focus of much of the intense theoretical activity of Paris in the 1960s and 1970s and played a vital role in the development of the key thinkers of the time, including Roland Barthes, Michel Foucault, Louis Althusser, Jacques Lacan, Julia Kristeva, and Philippe Sollers. Patrick ffrench traces its history, across the "time of theory" and the catastrophe of May 1968, to the review's controversial affirmation of literature as akin to theology in the late 1970s.

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go for the prof

Existential Marxism in Postwar France: From Sartre to Althusser


Existential Marxism in Postwar France: From Sartre to Althusser
by Mark Poster

# Hardcover: 415 pages
# Publisher: Princeton Univ (January 1977)


from a committed amazon reviewer:
Mark Poster walks the reader through sections of the history of 20th century French philosophy, delving a bit into other times and nations as well, in order to tell a story about what he terms "existential marxism". The sections on the influence of Hegel, as mediated by Kojeve and Hyppolite, are fairly good, though Vincent Descombes _Modern French Philosophy_ is better. Considering the importance that the early Marx has in Poster's narrative, Poster's handling of Marx and his French reception is a little quick, and doesn't offer as much as it should to readers unfamiliar with the _1844 Manuscripts_. Poster's discussion of existentialism is a little better, though the almost complete lack of attention to the philosophy Kierkegaard and Heidegger was a little puzzling. Poster's treatment of Merleau-Ponty is quite interesting, as is the relatively in depth section on Henri Lefebvre. Though it may not have been his intention, Poster demonstrates how Merleau-Ponty and Lefebvre prefigure a lot of ideas in parlance among 'postmodern' theorists, like the focus on ambiguity and open-endedness in M-P's case, and an analysis on the loss of signification and the alienation of every day life in Lefebvre's writing. Given Merleau-Ponty and Lefebvre's anticipation of and contributions to much of what are now considered 'postmodern' ideas, it's a shame the two are not more widely read. Hopefully Poster's sympathetic treatment will go a little ways to rectifying this.


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The Universal (in the Realm of the Sensible) by Olkowski


The Universal (in the Realm of the Sensible)
Beyond Continental Philosophy
by Dorothea Olkowski

# Hardcover: 256 pages
# Publisher: Edinburgh University Press (April 2007)

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here is the m'lady

The Practice of Everyday Life by de Certeau



The Practice of Everyday Life
by Michel de Certeau

# Paperback: 260 pages
# Publisher: University of California Press; 1 edition (December 2, 2002)

Priscilla P. Clark, Journal of Modern History
"The Practice of Everyday Life, published in 1974 and now the first of his books available in English translation, offers ample evidence why we should pay heed to de Certeau and why more of us have not done so. For one, the work all but defies definition. History, sociology, economics, literature and literary criticism, philosophy, and anthropology all come within de Certeau's ken. . . The Practice of Everyday Life marks a turning point in studies of culture away from the producer (writer, scientist, city planner) and the product (book, discourse, city street) to the consumer (reader, pedestrian). . . . In sum, de Certeau acts very much like his own ordinary hero, manipulating, elaborating, and inventing on the scientific authority that he both denies and requires."

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The French Counter-Enlightenment and the Making of Modernity


Enemies of the Enlightenment:
The French Counter-Enlightenment and the Making of Modernity
by Darrin M. McMahon

# Paperback: 288 pages
# Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA (July 18, 2002)

History has often overlooked the men and women who resisted the triumphal progress of Western society toward Reason: spiritual Luddites, it seems at first glance, hoping to smash the ideological machinery of atheism and democracy. But in this sophisticated deconstruction of conservative opposition to the Enlightenment, McMahon, a fellow in history at NYU, re-envisions intellectual history from 1750 to 1830 as an ideological dialectic foreshadowing the culture wars of our own time and helping to define modernity. As McMahon shows, many Catholics saw Voltaire and his ilk as harbingers of degenerate hedonism, a diabolical menace to church, state and family. These anti-philosophes accused their enemies of practicing the very intolerance they condemned, and were convinced that danger lurked in philosophic fanaticism. Their horrified voices, audible from the mid-18th century on, became louder as the Enlightenment gathered momentum. Unable to stop the French Revolution, their protests seemed prophetic to many when idealism turned to terror. The ghost of Counter-Enlightenment ideology has been conspicuous in more recent times in Spain, Italy and Latin America, just as the specter of leftist violence has been repeatedly invoked. McMahon's argument is deeply versed in recent scholarship; his prose is polished, and the book is illustrated with compelling examples of visual propaganda (notably, Voltaire caught in flagrante delicto). While this title lacks the mass appeal of Simon Schama's Citizens or other narrative-oriented histories of the revolution, its relevance to conservative-liberal tensions in the U.S. make it worthy of broad intellectual discussion.

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